Sep
14

#VDI Tip 78: Watch Out for USB Drivers

PCoIP errors

URBOIP :process_urb_sync_reset_pipe: Filtering pipe reset for device 0x2a01, pipe 0x813a1300 (ISO)

If you see the line above in your zero client logs you could have a USB driver issue. Windows does a great job for the most part at getting the drivers right but this can crop up time to time. If you can tie it back to the last device that user plugged into their zero client, you can install the driver into the base image.

PCoIP has a token system for USB(URBOIP). When a reset happens on the USB, a token is taken away, no more tokens no more USB. These resets can affect the audio/video for your zero clients so if you’re experiencing bad performance you can start to look here.

Mar
08

#VDI Tip 65 – Repeat After Me – Tools and then the Agent

Anytime you upgrade the VMware tools on your VDI image you need to reinstall the View agent again. The tools can replace the VGA driver and end up causing blurriness, disconnects or no connection at all. I found a nice table at the Teradici website and in a VMware KB that you can reference.

 

Windows XP

Windows Vista

Windows 7

View 3.1.3 build 252693

VMware SVGA II
Version: 11.6.0.35
Dated: 4/21/2010
VMware SVGA 3D
Version: 17.14.1.42
Dated: 4/21/2010

Not Supported

View 4.0.2 build 294291

VMware SVGA II
Version: 11.6.35
Dated: 4/21/2010
 

Not Supported

View 4.5.0 build 293049

VMware SVGA II
Version: 11.6.37
Dated: 7/16/2010
VMware SVGA II
Version: 11.6.37
Dated: 7/16/2010
VMware SVGA 3D
Version: 7.14.1.49
Dated: 7/16/2010

View 4.6.0 build 366101

VMware SVGA II
Version: 11.6.0.37
Dated: 7/16/2010
VMware SVGA II
Version: 11.6.0.37
Dated: 7/16/2010
VMware SVGA 3D
Version: 7.14.1.49
Dated: 7/16/2010
View 5.0 build 481677 VMware SVGA II
Version 11.7.5.0
Date: 7/12/2011
VMware SVGAII
Version: 11.7.5.0
Dated: 7/12/2011
VMware SVGA 3D
Version 7.14.1.1061
Date: 7/29/2011

VMware KB: The PCoIP server log reports the error: Error attaching to SVGADevTap, error 4000

Mar
01

#VDI Tip 64: Follow the Network Checklist

Funny thing about Virtual Desktop Infrastructure, it usually relies heavily on the network. Most of my last two days has been spent troubling shooting dropped PCoIP packets, so I feel it’s timely to make sure you have your basis covered.

So here is the big tip of the day, Read and follow this check list – PCoIP Virtual Desktop Network Design Checklist

Networking isn’t my strongest skill but luckily I work with some really smart people. I think the biggest take away from the checklist is WRED.(Weighted Random Early Detection). It provides preferential traffic handling for packets with higher priority. It can selectively discard lower priority traffic when the interface begins to get congested. Try to get your PCoIP traffic prioritized just under VoIP traffic. The above document notes ” Do not configure WRED on the physical interface as it will override all other QoS policies”. Most traffic monitoring tools are not granularity enough to catch the spikes in traffic. In the land PCoIP, 1 minute intervals does not pass the test.

If you have access to your Cisco Router, you can check for drop packets by using the CEF (Cisco Express Forwarding) commands.
show cef drop
show ip cef switching statistics

You can also check for high CPU utilization. Sometimes high CPU utilization will cause buffering. Buffering = BAD

Run something different than Cisco? Please comment and leave commands for other vendors.

Feb
20

#VDI Tip 61: Be Careful when using Client-side Caching with Thin Clients

Client-side caching provides huge bandwidth savings with VMware View 5. Client-side caching can save 30-40 percent of the overall bandwidth. The default size is set to 250 MB and can go up to 300 MB. With older thin clients that have less the 1 GB of RAM you may run into issues. If the client-side cache is set too high, you may start experiencing dropped sessions.

Thanks to Chuck Hirstius, the Master of PCoIP at VMware for making me aware of this issue. Give him a follow at @rexremus